wood-conserving stove

Josefa Breathes a Sigh of Relief

Josefa Breathes a Sigh of Relief

We asked Josefa Gonzales, a new participant in Chunox, Belize, what makes her happy. “When I have plenty of food for my family to eat and I’m not wringing my hands worrying where the next meal will come from,” she says.

Because of supporters like you, Josefa and her family now grow their own food supply, using organic, regenerative farming methods that nourish people and the planet.

Making the Connection: a Peace Corps Volunteer Reflects

Making the Connection: a Peace Corps Volunteer Reflects

The Peace Corps is an essential part of our origin story. Peace Corps Volunteers continue to be some of our most valuable resources in the rural areas where we work. Here, volunteer LaTaurus Whitley reflects on the power of finding the right partners at the right time.

Building a Brighter Future

Building a Brighter Future

Rafael Rodríguez and María Hernández are making changes that impact their entire community. From their innovative greenhouse with its super efficient irrigation system, to the wood-conserving stoves that are conserving trees and reducing health risks, this couple is paving the way for a bright future in La Candelaria, Panama.

Part 6 Happy Anniversary to Joaquín + Urita

Part 6 Happy Anniversary to Joaquín + Urita

Piedras Gordas, Panama— 31 years ago, amidst the festivities of patronales in Santa Marta, Panama, Urita and Joaquín first met. Saint Martha, is the patron saint of the small town where Urita was born and raised. Every year, Saint Martha is celebrated on July 29, during patronales.

People from all over had come to celebrate, play music, and feast. If you’ve ever attended a patronales celebration, the sounds of salomas (Panamanian shouts), the colors of the polleras (skirts), and the smells of bollos de maiz nuevo (sweet corn tamales) will already be familiar to you. Imagine a town full of flowers and bursts of color—everyone wearing their best hats, blouses, and earrings, dressed to the nines (including Urita and Joaquín).

Part 5 Climate Change Comes to Piedras Gordas

Part 5 Climate Change Comes to Piedras Gordas

“As a farmer, one of the effects of global warming I’ve noticed is how this once abundant brook has lost so much of its volume. It used to have many different species like shrimp, bream, and sardines. You can see how low it is now. The life it had is gone.

So, what do I want to say about this? We’re worried. The challenge for us is that we have to care for the planet. This affects all of us—children, teenagers, adults, and older people like me…we’re all in trouble."

Part 3 Urita: the Matriarch's Burden

Part 3 Urita: the Matriarch's Burden

“All of our children have their own aspirations,” says Urita. “Some want to study medicine, they want to make money. If any of them decide that they’d rather go in that direction, I just hope that they’d hire someone to keep working on the farm with us in their place so that we can continue on in the same manner that we have been working in.”