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Friday, 16 December 2011

Belize Program Update - Fall 2011

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Emphasizing multi-story forests and mixed plots, subsistence farmers working with SHI-Belize have increased their efforts to plant cacao, a major cash crop in the Toledo and Stann Creek Districts. The cacao seedlings being planted are still at least three years from their first harvest, but when they mature the wet beans will be sold to the local cacao cooperative Toledo Cacao Grower’s Association (TCGA), as well as Moho Cocoa.

During the last quarter of the fiscal year, participant families:
• planted 1,180 trees
• installed 59 composting eco-toilets
• cultivated 67 acres using sustainable and organic techniques
• organized 42 community training workshops attended by 154 families who would like to work with SHI in the future.

At the conclusion of the fiscal year, program participants had planted 12,687 trees, reforested approximately 50 acres, and managed more than 300 acres sustainably and organically.

English

"I volunteered with SHI in Honduras many years ago. It was an amazingly inspiring trip, not just because we were able to work side by side with the families we were there to support, but I was able to see firsthand exactly how SHI operates and why its techniques and approach are so successful. SHI is a charity well worth supporting because its mission isn't charity at all -- it's empowerment."

~ Amanda, SHI Supporter